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Embracing Imperfection (Garlic Harvest Part 2)

 In Permaculture

Written by: Sumati Shah; Go Go Green Thumbs

 

The parallels of spiritual work and personal growth and gardening just can’t be overlooked.

I’m excited about finding these nuggets and sharing them with YOU!  I hope you all find something to inspire or satisfy a curiosity!

For me, it’s often about adapting, discovering plans that didn’t come to fruition, or unexpected surprises, and flowing with them all as they come.

Embracing Imperfection: Because it’s a handy life skill, in general, and most definitely in the garden!

Step 1. Take a Chance: 

I planted my garlic crop a little late…Nov. 2019.  To raise the odds, the seed bulbs were from 2018 when I intended to but never managed to plant them!

Step 2. Cultivate your Plan:

I tended that garlic crop and watched for problems…saw none. Eagerly watched for progress to continue.

Step 3. Expect the Unexpected: 

Next, instead of being able to watch the scapes grow into their full glorious curlicue shapes….The crop just collapsed instead of maturing to drying yellow tips after scape harvest.

Step 4. Uncover the Lesson:

What went wrong? I’ve grown garlic before without issue, There were no pest problems and weeds were cleared out pretty regularly. But they probably got too much water a few times too many (there are other veggies behind them in the bed). The neck was really soft and rotten so I figured that was it and left them in situ and figured that it seemed a little unlikely but I’d just plant in another location for next season.

Step 5. Accept the Rewards:

As a result of all of the above, 2021 brings me 2 garlic harvests! I planted in autumn 2020 in a different location and that crop is doing well, but is also a bit later in maturing.

And I watched garlic come up all over again where it was planted back in 2019!

I was more careful about avoiding them being watered, and realise that area isn’t as dry as I’d thought it was.

The scapes were delicious in a lentil bread, and now I noticed the rot setting in again and so I’ve harvested them all with some of them not being optimal, the bulbs are smaller and some stems are rotted but the bulbs are firm.

Oh how I love the garden volunteers!  The seeds that appear on their own from the previous years’ crops, the rewards for working lovingly instead of seeking perfection.

The seeds are sometimes deliberately ‘aimed’ when I take down crops or as they mature I let a few go to seed.

Rule of Green Thumbs: If you want to attract finches to your garden, let a few lettuce plants bolt fully….its charming watching them sway on the soft stems.

Go Go Green Thumbs!

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